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Scoring Questions

The $10 billion would be scored against the bill in which it is enacted. The 2020 Budget proposes to enact it in authorizing legislation, in which case it would be scored as a PAYGO cost.

Section 8(a) of the proposed legislation classifies purchase transfers from the revolving fund as mandatory and directs that the amounts not be scored as either a PAYGO or discretionary cost. The justification for scoring no cost is that the costs of new capital projects are implicitly assumed in the baseline as a result of the original $10 billion mandatory appropriation and the annual repayments to the revolving fund. Using balances in the revolving fund to finance capital projects should not be scored a second time for budget enforcement purposes.

Section 8(d) of the proposed legislation requires OMB and CBO to score a cost equal to the required repayments against the discretionary cap. The revolving fund is not intended to be a free lunch. The repayments make the revolving fund a permanent source of funding for future capital projects.

No, section 8(c) requires the language to be scored as a PAYGO savings, not as a discretionary offset that can be used to increase discretionary funding for other purposes. The revolving fund is intended to be a permanent source of funding for capital projects, not for other purposes.

No, section 8(e) of the proposed legislation requires the language to be scored as discretionary cost. The revolving fund is intended to be a permanent source of funding for capital projects, not for other purposes.

No, section 8(c) requires the language to be scored as a PAYGO savings, not as a discretionary offset that can be used to increase discretionary funding for other purposes. The revolving fund is intended to be a permanent source of funding for capital projects, not for other purposes.

No, section 8(c) of the proposed legislation requires the language to be scored as a PAYGO savings, not as a discretionary offset that can be used to increase discretionary funding for other purposes. The revolving fund is intended to be a permanent source of funding for capital projects, not for other purposes.

Yes, it is next to impossible for one Congress to completely bind a future Congress. However, including the scoring rules in the legislation makes it more difficult for a future Congress to override the rules because CBO follows the rules in place when it scores legislation, not any new rules included in the legislation being scored. Therefore, CBO would likely score a significant cost to future legislation that overrides the scoring rules.

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